Phencyclidine Dot Org

All About Phencyclidine, Also Known As PCP

PCP use saw its highpoint during the 1970s and 80s. Users took to snorting and injecting PCP back then while smoking has become the method of choice in today’s drug culture. In spite of its “old school” status, PCP use continues on in this 21st century.

PCP belongs to the class of drugs known as hallucinogens, which are known to produce an “other-worldly” effect. While not as addictive as other classes of drugs, such as opiates and stimulants, continued use of hallucinogens can still bring about addiction problems.

Today’s drug culture has taken to lacing marijuana cigarettes with PCP and smoking them in order to experience the combined effects of both drugs. With both drugs being hallucinogens, users experience a more intense high by combining the two. This practice greatly increases the likelihood of developing PCP addiction.

According to the U. S. National Library of Medicine, an estimated 24 percent of marijuana sold on the streets is laced with PCP. Not surprisingly, PCP addiction rates have shown a steady rise over the past decade.

PCP addiction consequences can take any number of forms since this drug has adverse effects on the body and the mind. Considering PCP’s hallucinogenic effects, consequences of PCP addiction become more so apparent in long-time users.

PCP’s Effects

addiction dangers

An addiction to PCP can lead to many serious consequences, such as job loss and loss of custody over your children.

PCP has a dissociative type effect, leaving users in a state of mental detachment from their bodies while producing enhanced hallucinatory experiences. PCP most affects the areas of the brain that regulate memory, sensory perception and pain.

As PCP has no known medicinal purpose, it’s been assigned a Schedule I controlled substance classification, according to Columbia Health. Its effects result from surges in the brain’s serotonin levels. Serotonin functions as an essential neurotransmitter chemical that reaches well beyond its effects on memory, sensory perceptions and pain. Changes in serotonin levels create a domino effect that throws off other essential neurotransmitter levels.

Unlike opiates and stimulants, PCP addiction effects can be unpredictable in terms of the type of drug experience a person has. “Bad” trips and “good” trips can happen at any given time, while the effects of the drug can last as long as six hours at a time.

Physical Consequences

As brain chemical levels skew further out of balance, PCP’s effects start to impair the brain’s ability to regulate systems throughout the body. Consequently, PCP addiction results in widespread chemical imbalances that greatly compromise a person’s overall health.

Physical effects of PCP addiction include –

  • Dizzy spells
  • Profuse sweating
  • Abnormal movements of the eyes
  • Flushed skin tone
  • Vomiting, nausea
  • High pain threshold
  • Numbness in the legs

Psychological Consequences

The psychological consequences of PCP addiction can vary depending on the dosage amount normally used. According to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, the higher the dosage amount the more severe the effects.

Psychological effects from PCP addiction include –

    • Suspiciousness or paranoia
    • Delusions of grandeur and over-confidence
    • Violence-prone behavior displays
    • A warped sense of space and time
    • Confused thinking processes

Ultimately, the effects of PCP addiction gradually disrupt a person’s lifestyle to the point where he or she loses the ability to function normally in everyday life.

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